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Neuroscience

The Brain: An Introduction to Neuroscience (NEUR 0010, Fall, Paradiso & Stein):

Provides a general introduction to basic topics in neuroscience, ranging from the special properties of the nerve cell to perceptual and motor systems, and higher order functions including language and motivated behavior. Graduate, Undergraduate

Principles of Neurobiology (NEUR 1020, Spring, Connors):

Covers fundamental concepts of molecular and cellular neurobiology including the structure of ion channels, synaptic transmission, synaptic development, molecular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity, learning and memory, and neurological diseases. Graduate, Undergraduate

Advanced Cognitive Neuroscience (NEUR 2060, Spring, Sanes):

Focuses on cognitive approaches to study nervous system function. Lectures and discussions focus on neurophysiology, neuroimaging and lesion analysis in mammals including humans. Computational approaches will become integrated into the material. Topics include the major cognitive systems, including perception, decisions, learning and memory, emotion and reward, language, and higher cortical function. Graduate, Undergraduate

Neural Basis of Cognition (NEUR 1660, Spring, Mehta):

Lecture course. Emphasizes the systems approach to neuroscience and examines several neural systems that mediate perception, action, higher visual and motor processing, learning, memory, attention, emotion, consciousness and sleep. The course focuses on experiments involving behavioral electrophysiology and discusses mechanisms mediating neural activity that mediates cognition. Graduate, Undergraduate

Neural Systems (NEUR 1030, Fall, Sheinberg):

Examines key principles of neural systems ranging in complexity from peripheral receptors to central control of behavior. Graduate, Undergraduate

Neural Dynamics (NEUR 1930M, Fall, Moore):

What is Neural Dynamics? The ability of the same brain system (e.g., a neuron, cortical column, striosome or cortic-striatal loop) to demonstrate substantial differences in its range of operations (e.g., changes in response gain) and/or perform multiple computations (e.g., detection or discrimination, motor control or sequence learning). The term ‘dynamics’ in this context indicates that this brain system can shift between these computational modes or ranges of operation on a milliseconds to seconds time scale. Graduate, Undergraduate

Advanced Systems Neuroscience (NEUR 2050, Fall, Sanes):

Focuses on systems approaches to study nervous system function. Lectures and discussions focus on neurophysiology, neuroimaging and lesion analysis in mammals, including humans. Computational approaches will become integrated into the material. Topics include the major sensory, regulatory, and motor systems. Graduate, Undergraduate

Computational Neuroscience (NEUR 1680, Spring, Bienenstock):

A lecture and computing lab course providing an introduction to quantitative analysis of neural activity and encoding, as well as modeling of neurons and neural systems. Graduate, Undergraduate

Mathematical Methods in the Brain Sciences (APMA 0410, Fall, Bienenstock):

Basic mathematical methods commonly used in the cognitive and neural sciences. Topics include: introduction to differential equations, emphasizing qualitative behavior; introduction to probability and statistics, emphasizing hypothesis testing and modern nonparametric methods; and some elementary information theory. Examples from biology, psychology, and linguistics.Graduate, Undergraduate

Neural Dynamics: Theory and Modeling (APMA 2821V, Spring, Jones):

Our thoughts and actions are mediated by the dynamic activity of the brain’s neurons. This course will use mathematics and computational modeling as a tool to study neural dynamics at the level of signal neurons and in more complicated networks. We will focus on relevance to modern day neuroscience problems with a goal of linking dynamics to function. Topics will include biophysically detailed and reduced representations of neurons, bifurcation and phase plane analysis of neural activity, and neural rhythms. This course is for advanced undergraduate or graduate students and expands from NEURO 1440, however no neuroscience background is required. Prerequisites include APMA 0350-0360 and a Matlab programming course, or equivalent. Instructor permission required.Graduate, Undergraduate